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All Batman and DC Universe characters and merchandise are property of Warner Brothers, Dc Comics, or their subsidiaries and licensors.  This site is for fan and
educational purposes only.  Legions of Gotham and all information, logos, pictures and features are property of Matt MacNabb (c) 2003-2008
All Batman and DC Universe characters and merchandise are property of Warner Brothers, Dc Comics, or their subsidiaries and licensors.  This site is for fan and
educational purposes only.  Legions of Gotham and all information, logos, pictures and features are property of Matt MacNabb (c) 2003-2014
This section holds various bits of information and imagery related to the Dark Knight that doesn't necessarily fit anywhere
else on the site, but that we still deemed fun and important for fans to see.
The History of the Batmobile
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For all die hard Batman fans, the batmobile is something we’re all familiar with. There have been a whopping 244 versions through the
ages to adapt to the world Batman must fight in, taking in.
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The first incarnation of the iconic car appeared in a Detective Comics #27 back in May 1939, drawn by Bob Kane, though wasn’t given its
infamous ‘batmobile’ moniker at this early stage. It evolved in 1941 for the Batman comic. Batman #5 was one of the first of many masked
batmobiles, yet still did not contain many of the functions and gadgets we associate with the vehicle today.

Then Batman made his first foray onto the silver screen. For the
1943 Batman film, the caped crusader sported a 1939 Cadillac Series
Convertible. After his big screen debut, comic Batman went back to his masked mobile throughout the rest of the 40’s. A memorable
design by Dick Sprang and Charles Paris shows the car with a huge fin at the back.
1949 TV series Batman and Robin saw the batmobile return to a regular car. The name batmobile hadn’t been around for long at this point,
so the car was a simple stock 1949 Mercury Convertible.

The 50’s saw a major stylistic change in the batmobile. In February 1950, Detective Comics #156 had the unveiling of a new batmobile for
1950 on the front cover. Then in 1955 the vehicle became even more stylish thanks to a design by
Sheldon Moldoff and Charles Paris. This
slick machine featured a masked front, fins and was powered by air-cooled V2s. Impressive.
The 60’s then seen much more commercialisation of the batmobile. Ever wanted to ride in the fantastic vehicle? Well in the 60’s you finally
could, thanks to a wave of carnival ride machines. You could also own your very own batmobile thanks to small toys from Husky and Corgi.
Aurora Model Motoring followed suit in 1963, with the Thunderjet 500 model now a rarity and very much a collectible.
The batmobile also underwent some changes in the 60’s, with a version in Batman #164 seeming to show the vehicle smiling! By 1966 this
had changed from comical to curvy, an elegant design based on the
Jaguar XKE. Then of course the Batman TV launched mid-60’s
changing design again and bringing the car stylishly to life. George Barris managed to design the car for the show in 1966, transforming
Lincoln’s Futura concept into a sleek and practical transport for Batman.

By the 1970’s the batmobile was so popular, toys of the vehicle were popping up in places as far flung as Italy. In the comic books, the
batmobile was based on several different cars throughout the decade. From a Ford Daytona to a Ferrari and even the Porsche 904, the nifty
car had a lot of reimagining’s during the decade, with less masked fronts or finned rears.
In the 1980’s, Batman got harder, with a tank-like vehicle crushing opponents in the 1986 comic The Dark Knight Returns #2.  Carrying on
throughout the 80’s comics, the batmobile was a mean force to be reckoned with, even if it was also based on elegant corvettes and
classic 1940s shapes.

Then bingo! -the late 80’s sparked the Batman movies. In both the 1989 film and its sequel, a fantastic Anton Furst design was used,
featuring a turbo jet for a nose. The comics continued down the stylish route in the 90’s, in particular in the Legends of the Dark Knight
series, where the car looks based on a Viper. Both these changes fused a plethora of replica toys on the market.

From 2000 onwards, the batmobile fluctuated between a stylish sports car design and ridiculous futuristic concept in various comic
books. Hotwheels also created a range of cars that varied from the stylish to the sublime.
Then the last decade sparked more films with even more ambitious concepts – the Tumbler and the Batpod from The Dark Knight Rises
(2012). These scary hi-tech vehicles could allow the driver to do almost anything, though we recommend you
don’t play mobile games and
drive Batman, just because you can! Who knows what the future batmobiles will look like or how they will be styled out?